Working in hostels while you travel, Is it possible?

Working in hostels while you travel, Is it possible?

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Hosting in a hostel is the option travelers, especially young travelers, choose the most. This options brings you the opportunity to stay in a safe place, meet people from other countries and safe money because shared rooms are not expensive at all. Actually, when the first hostel opened, its creator, a German teacher Richard Schirrmann, thought about a place where visitors can host without expending too much money. It was in Altena, Germany, during 1908 and 1912 where and when this idea emerged. This teacher used to go to the forest with his students in order to be more in contact with nature. Therefore, the idea of opening a hostel where young travelers with different languages, cultures and nationalities could share experiences and feel more motivated for exploring new experiences.

As travelers are more and more motivated to travel, hundreds of hotels open their doors for both, travelers and travelers who also want to work in any service hostels need some help. They know they are surrounded by likeminded people, most who are on the same path of adventure and self-discovery as them. The main tips you need to have if you want to work in a Backpacker hostel are the following:

  1. Have an open mind: New things should not be excuse for not experiencing new tastes, sounds or habits.
  2. Get on the good side of your boss: Whatever your boss decided, help him/her in every single task he or she asks you.
  3. Get networked in with the local businesses: Travelers will need some recommendations about restaurants, bars, shops. So, keep with you a hand out about the places travelers look for the most.
  4. Own the free food shelf: when people leave a free box of wine and some freshly ground coffee, take them with you. This will cut your costs.
  5. Chat to EVERYONE: Make sure to have good contacts. As your network becomes bigger, you will have more places where to arrive. It sounds great, Isn’t it?
  6. Get in tight with the long terms: You will share some amazing experiences and help each other out. They are the ones who end up being long term friends.
  7. Be ready to say goodbye: It is tough to say goodbye to great people whom have made “click” with you but new amazing people will fill their beds.
  8. Train your liver!: Working in a chaotic travel environment with people who have time and money to kill means you will party most nights, go get messed up and make some bad decisions! Take some time out occasionally though!
  9. Cook: It will create a good vibe since everyone will socialize and it keeps the cost of eating down.
Image courtesy of dishwab at Flickr.com
Image courtesy of dishwab at Flickr.com

Seeing as you’ll be working in a very international environment, the one skill that is really going to stand out is language skills. Naturally, hostels want to be able to effectively communicate with as many different guests as possible, so will want to tick off as many different native languages as they can. If you can speak a language no other staff member can, that’s really going to help you to pull ahead. But if your foreign language skills are not that good, this is the perfect opportunity for you to improve them and practice what you will learn every day.

Despite, hostels are laid back and fun places to work, you should lame out on your application. Write a full CV detailing your past experience, tailored toward proving why you would fit the position perfectly. Include all the usual, like work experience, qualifications and personal interests (one of which should be travel), and really labor where skills match.

And of course, all this doesn’t mean you have to come across as stuffy, you can still put something of your character into the writing. But that’s just it, write; write in full and legible sentences that show enthusiasm and professionalism. Top it all off with a cover letter that lets your personality shine through.

In small hostels, you’re pretty likely to meet the owner or manager before you, this is excellent because if things end up good, they will help you out in whatever you need so. Nevertheless, bigger hostels tend to have more processes and rules even if they need more staff than the smaller ones, they are harder to work in. It happens because regulations and security rules tie their hands so, they will only hire you on a contract, and insist that you’re legal to work and pay tax (something the smaller hostels often overlook).

Take a look on different web pages and social networks. Hostels publish there their vacancies and it is not difficult to be in contact with them.

Image courtesy of Jim Kelly at Flickr.com
Image courtesy of Jim Kelly at Flickr.com
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