Tips for a Solid Phone Interview

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The phone interview is an important part of the hiring process for many companies, as it helps employers to screen applicants before going through the time and expense of bringing them in to speak with somebody. While it tends to be a preliminary step, a solid phone interview can help you to land a position. Since an employer can’t glean any information from your body language during a phone interview, it’s especially important to speak clearly when you have one. Use the following tips to make sure you do so:

– Schedule your interview for a time when you’re alert and awake. If you get out of bed 10 minutes before the interview, you may sound groggy, which will make it difficult for the interviewer to understand you. Make sure you’re up at least an hour before your interview begins.

– Control your breathing. Deep breaths can do wonders for your speaking ability and clarity of mind. Before your interview begins, take a moment and breathe deeply so that you start off calmly and focus on your words.

– Use good posture. Sitting up straight rather than lounging or slouching will help to improve your breathing and make you come across as alert and confident. If necessary, you may want to take the call standing up so that you feel energized.

– Ensure that you have water nearby, but don’t overdo it. If your mouth dries up halfway through the interview, you’ll want to have a glass of water on hand so that you can stay hydrated. However, drinking also interrupts the phone call, so only reach for your glass if it’s strictly necessary.

– Don’t snack. Like drinking, snacking can interrupt the interview. You don’t want to be caught with food in your mouth or making unpleasant smacking noises while the interviewer is speaking either. Eat well before your interview instead.

– Consider purchasing a headset. You may need your hands to flip through notes or write things down during the interview, so consider using a telephone headset. Trying to hold the phone between your shoulder and cheek isn’t optimal for clear communication.

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