How to Make a Good Impression on Your First Day at Work

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People sometimes think that the hard work is over once they’ve been hired for a job. On the contrary, individuals need to think about the importance of making a good first impression and striving to make themselves memorable on their first day of work. When people start off on the right foot, they can go a lot farther more quickly than when they need to recover from an initial blunder. First impressions rely on a number of obvious factors. Individuals should show up slightly early to demonstrate their commitment to the position and wear clothing that is neat and professional. Beyond these obvious points, however, individuals can do a lot more to make a great first impression.

First, they should practice making an introduction. Beyond a firm handshake and eye contact, a proper introduction should include a few words about the person’s background. Most people already have a pitch from interviews, but the on-the-job introduction is slightly different. The introduction can also vary depending on whether the new person is a boss or a colleague.

In general, new employees should also try to make a personal connection with the other people at the company. By talking openly about their passions and pastimes, individuals can give other people a better picture of themselves, while also setting the stage for improved working relationships. Individuals can also forge relationships by sharing what they know and making suggestions for better operating procedures. In this latter case, new employees should phrase suggestions in a non-aggressive and helpful way.

Most candidates conduct some research about a company before interviewing. This sort of research is key to making a good impression during the first few days of employment. By demonstrating their knowledge of the company, new employees show enthusiasm for the work. Also, this sort of knowledge base allows individuals to ask great questions. However, individuals should never be afraid to ask questions for fear that may seem mundane, especially when they are new. Moreover, new employees often find it helpful to take notes on everything from their co-workers’ names to procedures in order to avoid having to ask the same questions again.

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